Slivers of Sunshine

wil star selfieLast night, as I was putting Wil to bed after his first day of 3rd grade, I laid next to him, my head sharing his pillow, and watched his smiling face as he rattled off the events of the day. He spoke just as excitedly as he had done when he hopped off the bus earlier that day. One sentence following another, though broken in places, still fully comprehensible. My boy was speaking in paragraphs!

It wasn’t so long ago, I was counting his words and celebrated the pinnacle of a 5 word sentence. Those 5 words spilled from his mouth like he’d been speaking 5 word sentences for years, only he’d been stuck in a Neverland of 2-3 word sentences for months.
And, that is how it goes. An ebb and flow of stops and starts. Just enough starts to give you the strength you need to get over the many stops.

Wil has been in speech therapy since he was a baby, and one thing that gave me great hope for his speaking ability was how he could sing full songs before even uttering a sentence. His singing was like a special sneak peak of what was to come. They were what kept me going whenever we hit a seemingly immovable speech roadblock. There would be few words, but he could belt out the entirety of “You Are My Sunshine.” His singing was like a soothing tonic, gently reminding me that he would speak, it would just be in his own time.

Wil’s preschool speech therapist had many wonderful techniques, and she would share them with me to reinforce at home. One of my favorites were the sheets of mimeographed paper she sent home with Wil (yes, that paper from back in the day, with the little holes on the perforated edges, that would come off the printer fresh with purple ink). She would write words in colored marker on those big mimeographed sheets, and after she and Wil had worked on them at school, she would send them home with him. Wil and I would scotch tape the paper up on the walls of his bedroom.

Every time I changed Wil’s diaper (potty training is a whole other blog! 🙂 ) and I would look at the sheet of paper hanging above his changing table, and recite the words written on it together. Later, when it was time to change into pjs, we would choose another sheet hanging on the wall, and recite words as he changed clothes. He thought it was great fun, and so we found it very effective. Every time he’d walk in his room, Wil would point to a paper and smilingly exclaim his speech therapists name, “Miss Theresa!”

Over time, when those words sank in and Wil began to associate meaning with them, he would start using them in the appropriate time and place, very naturally, yet quite unexpectedly. He would walk in the kitchen, throw out a word like he’d been saying it all his life, and I’d be standing there shell-shocked for a second, and then practically start jumping for joy the next, while he would be looking at me like I had just lost my mind.

Fast forward to 3rd grade, listening to my son rattle off about his day, I thought about how very blessed I am. Life is truly in how you look at things. I am forever thankful that I now know how to find hope in a song, and how old sheets of mimeographed paper hanging on a wall can feel like an arm around my family’s shoulder on this journey. They are all slivers of sunshine, edging and brightening the clouds, showing you the sun is there, lying in wait, ready to shine, in its very own time.

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