Follow me on WILingness.com

wilingness01

Hi!! I have a new website where I am posting all of my current blogs. Please visit me on http://www.WILingness.com

You follow WILingness on Facebook, Twitter and via email! Just visit WILingness.com and click to follow. See you there!

~Christie

How about adding a little WILingness to your Life?

Hi All!wilingness01

I’m pretty darn excited!! I have a real live website now with a real live logo and everything! And to use Wil’s words, I did it ALL BY MYSELF! The website is www.WILingness.com

I even created a fun, upbeat short 45 second video introducing my son, Wil! Head over to Wilingness.com and check it out! I just know it will leave you with a smile!

My writing over the years has found it’s way to a central theme, which is opening my eyes to the power of small miracles all around us, and I only discovered them when I had the WILingness to see them. (clever, huh?!)

Sooo, this website will have some blogs you’ve seen before, and lots of new upcoming ones, all with the central theme of “WILingness.”

Now that I have the video thing figured out, I’ll be doing some of my blogs via video podcast. It’s big girl time now! 🙂

I’m only just getting started, but do me a favor and stop by to check out the VIDEO, LIKE Wilingness on Facebook, and SHARE and/or comment away. And I have a page on this new website titled WHY WILINGNESS if you are still confused about the name 😉

Thanks for checking out www.WILingness.com!!! Your comments are requested and appreciated!!

All the best,

Christie

 

Its a Stone’s Throw: Spreading Down Syndrome Awareness

BW 2015 Stommen

Last night, stretched out next to Wil in his bed, having just finished reading him his bed time story, I pointed up to the pieces of paper taped on the wall next to us.

“Where is the beetle?” I asked, and he pointed to the picture with a colorful crayon drawn bug.

“I did that one!” He said.

“Yes, I love her purple head.” I said.

“And, orange feet!” He replied.

“How do you like Ms. Wier?” I asked (Ms. Wier is his new resource room teacher).

“I like her.” He said.

“What did you do with Ms. Wier today?” I asked.

“I don’t know.”

“You mean, I’m thinking?” (A great technique I learned from Wil’s summer speech therapist.)

“Yes, I’m thinking.” (Ha! It worked again!)

“Ok, what’s ONE thing? Just one thing you did today with Ms. Wier?” I asked. “Did you count dots? Go over to the bean bag room?”

“The Fall book!” And, then it all started tumbling out.

I laid there, listening, so thankful. So thankful he could now tell me these things, and so thankful he is with people who love him during the day. People who want him to learn just as much as I do.

And, sometimes, I also feel an overwhelming sadness come over me during these same moments. I think of the sweet babies with Down syndrome in the orphanages overseas, or even children here in the US, who were given away, just because of their teeny tiny extra chromosome. Children who have no one to ask them how their day was, children who are not told they are loved. They fall further and further behind by the day, proving the statistics that their parents so feared, simply because they are not given the love, the time, or the opportunity. As these thoughts run through my head, I look, in close up view, at my beautiful boy’s face, his sweet soft pale skin, the pink cheeks, that bright smile, and his wispy blond hair. I smooth his hair back and say to him:
“You are so very loved Wil. I love you so much, I want you to know that.”

He smiles, and says, “I know!” And he goes right back to telling me all the things he did with Ms. Weir that he “didn’t know” just a few moments ago.

When I have these happy/sad moments, I think back on Mother Teresa’s quote, “I alone cannot change the world, but I can cast a stone across the waters to create many ripples.”

Last Sunday, our Ds support group had our annual Buddy Walk. It was a beautiful, sunny day, the energy was high and the support for Wil and his friends with Down syndrome was no less than amazing! Wil and his buddies with and without Down syndrome held hands on the one mile trek, parents snapped pictures on the playground fixtures along the way, everyone devoured pizza, enjoyed cotton candy, participated in crafts and danced together. There is no fear of those 47 chromosomes on Buddy Walk day. In fact, those with the extra chromosomes are celebrated! And, the best part is, that celebration of our kids does not live only on Buddy Walk day. It spreads far and beyond. We carry that love with us, and have the power to influence others with that love; it is a stone cast across the waters creating many ripples.

I will still have those happy/sad moments lying next to my boy in the times to come; the great waves of gratitude, and the tides of sadness for the sweet souls who have been so sadly left behind. But, maybe, just maybe, for all of those that love my son and his friends, their love will spread to reach a mother in doubt at just the right time. And, that one mother, having been given the opportunity to see her child’s extra chromosome in a new light, will feel her fear dissipate. Over time, as her love grows, she, having known doubt, will become a stronger advocate, having even more power to focus her light on those mired in fear and doubt. And, so the stone is cast across the waters.

ON ROYALTY, GOLDEN PEOPLE & FENCES

This morning, I took Elizabeth to the orthodontist. It was a first consultation, so everything was very easy going and pleasant. Her orthodontist shares the name of Elizabeth’s twin sister, Katherine, and when I told her, she replied that we have royalty in our house. A queen and a princess. I laughed, and said, “Would you believe we also have a prince? Prince William.”

“We do, too!” She said. “He is my little prince. He was born prematurely.” We talked briefly about her William, and then eased back into orthodontic talk surrounding Elizabeth.

As we were leaving, I mentioned that my William would be coming to see her soon, as well. She asked what she would be seeing him for, and I mentioned a cross bite and the need for an expander, because his mouth plate was too small for all of his teeth. I told her he had Down syndrome, so these issues were quite typical, and she nodded knowingly and asked how he did at the dentist. I told her it was a big struggle at first, but the last two visits, now with Dr. LaRock, had gone quite smoothly. Great, she said, maybe I could bring him in on Elizabeth’s next visit to get him comfortable here. Then, she shared with me that her William also had learning issues, due to his prematurity, but he had a great teacher this year, the same one her other son had the previous year, so she was much relieved. I replied to that, “Yes, I understand. Every year, it’s like starting at zero. It’s a wonderful relief when you don’t have to.”

“Ah, yes!” She nodded in agreement, “It’s exactly that, isn’t it? With all of his academic issues, I just want him to be happy at school.”

There are so many pieces that go together to make that work, the parents, the siblings, the IEPs, the teachers, the assistants, the special ed director, the therapists, the peers, and the laws to be upheld if not being adhered to. I have found, in this journey with a child with special needs, the explaining can be freaking exhausting. When I happen upon a doctor, or a school administrator, that just gets it like she does, I know I have struck gold.

The royal woman who shares my daughter’s name will undoubtedly be Wil’s orthodontist.

Not too long ago, I was having a very trying morning with Wil. I left the house out of sorts, to teach a bootcamp class. I pumped myself up on the way, and taught the class in high spirits, but underneath that morning was still tugging on me. After class was completed, and we all dropped on the mat to stretch, I happened to sit down with two other mothers who have kids with special needs. We talked about typical everyday things, slow and easy, enjoying the reward of the down time after a tough class. I could no longer ignore the downward pull I was feeling, and as the class emptied out, and we still sat there, foam rolling our sore muscles, I shared that I was frustrated from my morning, and I was having a hard time shaking it. They immediately gave me a nod of understanding, just like the kind doctor earlier today. They got it. No explaining needed. They opened up, began sharing some of their stories, and though our children all had different disabilities and challenges, the underlying emotions were the same. We formed a bond, and I knew, these friends were golden.

A diagnosis immediately places you in a very vulnerable position. It can be very scary at first, it’s uncharted territory for you. But you meet people who understand, who get it, and they help you along the way when you need it. You learn, and you grow, and begin to understand how golden that innate understanding is. I have lived and I have learned. There are people who have dove in and criticized, how I “Should” be doing things this way, and “should do” that and judged every little move I made. But, the funny part is, not a single one of them has a child like Wil. They are the sideline critics, and I no longer have time for them. Their words are loud, but hold no meaning. There is a quote that says, be vulnerable, then put up a big fence.

Then, there are the golden people. When I started opening myself up, so many amazing coincidences have happened that invited them into my life, for which I am eternally thankful.

In this life, I have found that unity and a sense of community is everything. These friends are my gold, they are my shine. We serve to brighten one another. And, if you are one of those that enjoys throwing stones at things that shine, I hope you enjoy the view of our big fence.

ivy wil

Why I Loved It When a Girl Yelled at My Son With Down Syndrome

The story I wrote about Wil and Lila was just published in The Mighty!!! This story touches my heart and holds a message I’m thrilled will be shared. Please feel free to share this story with friends. Thank you!

http://themighty.com/2015/09/why-i-loved-it-when-a-girl-yelled-at-my-son-with-down-syndrome/

A Coke, A Hug, and A Smile

Beckie and Wil

Monday night, I was talking with one of my friends who is a skilled nurse, and many of her patients struggle with mental illness. Upon entering the room of one new patient, she found the woman on her bed, sobbing uncontrollably. When my friend calmed her down enough to inquire what the problem was, the poor woman blurted out, “Someone took my Coke away! All I wanted was a Coke with crushed ice!”

My friend made her way down the hall, and returned with a nice cold, fizzing drink filled with crushed ice. The woman stopped crying immediately and thanked her profusely.

“A Coke with crushed ice is her world right now,” my friend explained.

I do not understand this woman’s mental illness like my friend does, I have neither the training nor the experience, but I do understand what a diagnosis does to you. I have felt how it pulls the rug hard and fast from under your feet, and leaves you suspended in time, a whirl of scientific terms and statistics closing in on you. Your world has instantly been de-humanized, and you crave something that gives you comfort, some human understanding, in this too close and confusing place. And then, someone takes your freaking Coke with crushed ice away? What the hell?

I have a dear friend who recently went through a deep depression. I had never seen her like this, and I was really scared for her well-being. I sat with her and listened to her long-buried struggles bubbling to the surface, and how terrifying and difficult it was to make her way through them. I felt so ill equipped to help her, but I didn’t want to burden her anymore than she already was by asking what she needed from me, so I was there for her in person as much as I could be. Finally, I admitted to her that where she was scared me, and I wanted to help her any way I could, so please tell me, how can I be there for you in the way you need?

And, she said, just be you, that is enough.

Whenever anyone asks me about how I felt when Wil was diagnosed with Down syndrome, it’s like I have this internal zoom lens that beams me back to the day he was born, with his 7 lb body wrapped tight in a white hospital blanket with a thick blue and pink stripe, laid upon my chest covered in a thin, dull white hospital gown, with little faded blue patterns. The internal camera zooms further still, and rests in a full close-up of his eyes. Those big, blue almond shaped eyes.

So many people did not know what to say at that time. Heck, I didn’t know what to say. Then, my girlfriend Kelly, who I called up shortly after Wil was born, and sobbed into the phone that he had Down syndrome, asked me, “Well, how much does he weigh?”

What a refreshingly normal question! In that one question, I felt a sense of normalcy and of community, two things I had been sorely missing in those tight four hospital walls. I am sure my emotions at that time were not much different than the woman who was delivered that sparkling Coke with crushed ice that had so recently been taken from her.

So, when my dear friend struggling with depression answered my question of how I could help, by saying she only needed me to be me, that was enough, I fully understood. I needed no further explanation.

I think, many times, when we want so desperately to help a friend struggling with a diagnosis, it’s easy to get caught in the trap of thinking we need to do or say something extra special, when what they really need is the normalcy we bring with us, and a comforting sense of community.

And, if she cries out for a Coke and crushed ice, for pete’s sake don’t question it, be a friend and get her one, and deliver that Coke with a hug and smile. A friend deserves nothing less.

Oh, Did You Say Something About An Apostrophe? Sorry, I Was Too Busy Washing Underwear.

Wil & Ivy

Sometimes I get really frustrated with the special needs community, including myself.

Let me preface that statement with the fact that I LOVE and COMPLETELY ADORE the people of DSST. They are my tribe, my people. They are overflowing with awesomeness and will stop whatever they are doing to laugh with me, cry with me, and walk me through any situation, and I am fully present to do the same for every single one of them.

Ok, that said, let’s get down to business.

I just saw an article with the subject about whether or not Downs(as in, Downs syndrome) needs or does not need an apostrophe, and I’m over here, like, my kid has been pooping his pants for the last month, we have no idea why. Is it constipation, is it nervousness, is it nutrition, and so tell me why the heck am I supposed to care where someone places their apostrophe in the word Down syndrome again? ….http://christieleightaylor.com/oh-did-you-say-something-about-an-apostrophe-sorry-i-was-too-busy-washing-underwear/

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