Alcoholism and Intuition

There is a lot of alcoholism in my family, and I have had a hard time making peace with my own drinking over the years. I have enjoyed a glass or two of wine every night. It relaxed me, and is something just for me in a life of being a caregiver to my family.

For some that is a lot, for others it is not enough, but the point is, is it ok for me? And, I decided it’s not. I have too many past feelings and emotions surrounding alcohol. I’ve discussed it with Matt, and because he has not dealt directly with alcoholism, he does not understand my fear of one or two glasses a night. He is supportive, but cannot relate. What can these few glasses hurt? I drink responsibly, so why can’t I allow myself this? That makes perfect sense, except for the nagging feeling within me that it’s not ok.

I’ve learned, over the years, and especially with raising a child with more needs, a lot about self-care. It is a must. I also have learned to shut out other people’s “Shoulds” for me, and listen closely to my intuition and follow my own direction.

So, I decided to stop this glass a night drinking. I will still enjoy a few cocktails with Matt on the weekends, but the habitual week days, no. So, on my last shopping trip, I did not buy any wine. I admit it was hard. I had grown to rely on that glass for my relaxation. But, I know, to quit a habit, and be successful in sustaining it, I must put something positive in its place.

I heated myself some decaf tea, stirred in a big, sweet spoonful of my neighbor’s homegrown honey, took a cozy fleece blanket outside and sat on the back porch. The cat hopped up on my lap, and her purr motor was very lulling. Soon, Wil found me outside, pulled his wagon out of the garage, full of toys, and he pulled it around the yard singing to himself.

Positive reinforcement for kicking a habit? Hell yes! This experience is exactly what sat right with me deep down.

No matter what anyone else says or does, living at peace with my inner self and beliefs is what fulfillment is really about. There are no if, ands, buts or shoulds about it.

So, I raise my favorite tea mug from my back porch to yours, and I pray we all find the strength to bring forth the joy within ourselves to live the lives we personally choose to live.

Shine on in your own way, every day. We are worth nothing less.

life_is_good_half_full

Advertisements

Why Real Life Ninja Turtle Warriors Eat Ice Cream

Wil vanilla shake 2015

In the late summer, the kids and I went to a local wine and cheese store. I wanted to pick up a nice bottle of wine and gourmet cheese for my mom’s birthday. We parked, and headed inside.

There is an ice cream shop down the street and the kids asked if we could go afterwards. It was a warm, calm and slightly overcast day. Perfect for sitting outside.

“Sure, I said, let’s get these things for Grandma, and we’ll walk down there.”

They practically skipped into the wine and cheese store with that news, and I started my search for my mom’s gift. It wasn’t long before Wil found nothing interesting and wandered off to the stairs and made his way to the basement. I quickly inquired if there was a door to the outside (that Wil could escape from). No, the owner said, don’t worry, the only door goes to the bathroom.

I allowed Wil that time downstairs, while the girls and I tasted cheeses. We tried varied thin slices of many exotic and sharp flavors. We had fun, relaxed-mother daughter time that is not always possible with their busy, younger brother around.

We agreed on a white sharp cheddar and raspberry for Grandma that packed a strong bite followed by a touch of sweetness. As we waited in line to check-out, Wil had made it back upstairs and wandered over to the coffee grounds. Katherine saw a mess in the making, so without a word, she walked over, took his hands in hers, and started spinning him in circles. Gentle and slow, mindful of the fragile merchandise around them, the two of them singing and laughing.

The potential mess gleefully averted, we walked out, purchases in two pretty black bags, and made our way down the street for some ice cream. Everyone was in great spirits (who isn’t when there is ice cream ahead?) The street was busy, so I had one hand on Wil, as he can take off at a moment’s notice. I needn’t have worried, he stayed happily beside his sisters without a glance at the street.

When we approached the ice cream shop, there was a face painter set up just outside of it. After we went inside and bought our ice cream, we found a table just adjacent to the artist and watched passerby’s stop to get their faces painted. One boy chose an eerie white skull, 2 girls selected blue and pink glitter-covered butterflies, and one mother decided on a graceful swan princess.

As the line to the artist diminished, I looked over to the twins and asked if they wanted to go next. They laughed and shook their heads. Apparently, at the ripe age of 10, they were just too grown up for such silliness.

Wil jumped to attention. “Me, me, me!” he said raising his hand. He walked up to the face painting chart and chose a green and orange ninja turtle.

I walked over to the stool with him, and he climbed up on that tall stool on his own, and turned himself around and sat down. The artist asked him to close his eyes. He squinted them real tight, just like kids do when you tell them to pretend to sleep, and peeked with one eye.

The girls and I watched the artist as she went to work, smiling at her squinting subject. When his orange and green ninja turtle mask was completed, the artist held up a mirror for his observation. A look of satisfaction spread across his face, and he hopped down off of the stool to finish his vanilla shake.

Soon afterwards, we all piled into the car, and Wil asked me to adjust my rearview mirror so he could take in his reflection from the back seat. He repeatedly rotated his head this way and that, eyes straight and steady in the mirror taking in every angle of his ninja likeness the entire drive home.

Peeking up at Wil observe himself in the mirror, I marveled how Wil so naturally slows things down, just enough, so that I will never look at a typical day as typical again. There are so many adjustments to our family’s regular day to day that I can never move too fast to miss the many varied perspectives on even the simplest of moments.

And, isn’t that how we learn to be Ninja Turtle Warriors? By slowing down, just enough to look at a moment in all of its varied angles, so when things start to get messy, we are not stumped, rather, are able to jump in, grab that moment gently by the hands, and spin and sing our way through it, until the moment has passed, and we find ourselves in a new direction, run-skipping our way to the ice cream store.

Yep, I’m absolutely sure that’s what true, real life Ninja Turtle Warriors do.

 

Why I’m Sticking With Gratitude

Yesterday, after teaching a morning bootcamp class, I zipped over to the grocery store. The plan was to make it a quick trip. I had a load of things I wanted to accomplish before my afternoon class.

Cool, I thought, the parking lot is near empty, I pulled into a front parking spot, and grabbed myself a big cart (I established a personal rule of no small carts, no matter how small the trip, after the very embarrassing small-cart-incident of unexpectedly hitting a dip in the parking lot, the abrupt stop of the cart almost sending me barreling headfirst, in plain full parking lot view, right over top). The big cart and I safely and efficiently cruised through the aisles, finishing in record speed at the check-out line, with only one woman in front of me, who was already swiping her credit card. Score!

When it was my turn, the woman behind the check-out counter smilingly asked her required questions: Had I had found everything ok, and how was I doing? We then made typical check-out counter small talk as she swiftly swiped my items; what a beautiful day it was, how warm and sunny, and so on. Friendly, yet impersonal. And, I probably would have left the store in about 3 more minutes, with a lift to my step from the ease and friendliness of the experience, but without much further thought as I moved on with the rest of my day. Instead, I turned my head to the new sound of voices entering the quiet of the store.

A small group of kids, all with varying special needs, and their educators, were walking in and grabbing carts. There was a lot of excited chatter amidst the distribution of carts, and once a cart was in hand, a child and their educator were happily off on their shopping adventure. I spotted the back of the blond head of one of Wil’s friends, Nick, as he expertly made his way down the aisle with his cart.

The check-out woman saw me looking their way, and said, “That is a special needs class from Saline schools.” To which I replied, “One of those boys is my son’s friend. They both have Down syndrome. I was hoping to catch his eye, but he went off shopping in the other direction.”

“Oh,” she said, “I was a para-educator for 20 years. My son also had special needs. He went to school at Highpoint (a school for kids with a higher level of needs).” “I know Highpoint,” I said, “I used to work at the WISD and my neighbor recently retired from there.”

“When I started teaching,” she told me, “they were just starting inclusion. I believe in inclusion, but it’s not right for all of our kids. My son needed to be at a place like Highpoint.”

“I understand,” I said. “I’m so thankful for the inclusion my son has right now. We have not had to fight for it, he naturally receives what you had to fight for those years ago. Yet, I also understand what you are saying about inclusion not being right for everyone. Though my son enjoys and benefits from inclusion, I found in certain subjects, like math, the most effective place for him to be is in the resource room. Each child is very different.”

She nodded. “My son was completely typical, then he almost drowned when he was 2 ½. After that, he had multiple special needs, too many to be at a regular school with inclusion.”

She paused, then looked me right in the eye, I could tell she was deciding if she should share something with me, then she did.

“You know, there are some things worse than dying. To have a typical child and then…”

My heart went to the pit of my stomach. I looked at her gently, and all I could do was nod. What words are there for something as heavy as that?

“My son did die, he was only 10 years old. I have 6 children, so, well, that helps.”

But, what can truly help? She did what she could to cope. She helped other parents who had kids with special needs as a para-educator. I have absolutely no doubt that many parents found comfort in her knowing nods and compassionate words when she was responsible for the care of their child each day. I also have no doubt that those kids under her care received her best. You don’t go through what she did, and do the work she did for 20 years if you don’t care deeply about the purpose of that work.

We talked a little more, but by then my items had been checked and bagged, and a man was waiting behind me in line. It was time to go. I told her it was really good talking with her, and we wished each other a good day. I know I will make a point to find her line again.

Back at my car, filling it with groceries, I thought of our conversation. It was heavy, yes, but also, I felt a huge sense of gratitude for that time with her. Gratitude that she chose to share her story with me so that I could connect with her and learn from her in my very own life experiences.

Good days are good. The front parking space, the cruising through the uncrowded aisles, the smile and friendliness of a check-out worker, and the sun burning away the clouds and warming the air. They lift us, they carry us to a certain point, and they even spread, but they don’t run very deep, because they don’t stick. We catch them and hold on to them when we can, and enjoy them, but they are unpredictable and fleeting. They come, and they go.

Stories shared and connections made as in the one at the grocery store have staying power. They stick. I am never left the same after conversations like that, and it’s a wonder, how many I have had just like that since Wil has been born. And, it’s in these very unlikely, common places where they happen.

Last Saturday, I was in the hallway at Katherine’s karate tournament. I happened to put on a necklace that morning that our Down Syndrome Support Team sells. They are beautiful, handmade necklaces, and nothing about them says “special needs” except for the fact that they are sold at our Buddy Walk each year, the proceeds going to our support group. In the crowd of people walking back and forth in that hallway at the tournament, a blond woman stopped, pointed at my necklace and said, “Buddy Walk! I have about 5 of those! I love them, and yours is especially beautiful!”

“Thank you,” I said, “do you have a Buddy you walk for?”

“Oh, lots of them. I’m a special education teacher in Saline.”

We shared a smile, and went on our own separate ways down the busy hallway.

A passing friendly comment on a piece of jewelry in a crowded public place, but it will last longer than the smile she gave me. That compliment drives deeper, because it carries with it a common purpose, a common cause, which we both innately understand in those few words we exchanged.

At a birthday party I went to at a lake, where Wil was happily splashing around, a woman walked up to me, and said, “Your son reminds me of mine when he was your son’s age. So blond, so sweet. I miss him at that age.” And, then we shared stories like old friends reconnected about our kids and our lives, except we had only met that very moment, and our only known connection was Down syndrome. I learned so much about the experiences Wil could look forward to in her stories, and she was able to look back and relive some of her son’s youth.

I can recount many such stories, in restaurants, walking down the street wearing my Buddy Walk shirt, and other such every day places. I believe that I am so easily approached with these experiences is not for any other reason than that I am open to them now, when I wasn’t before. I did not have the “WIL”lingness those years ago that I do now.

Last night, I went to bed overflowing with gratitude. Not because of a front parking spot or the ease of my day, but because I now have opened myself to the gift of looking underneath the surface shine. Diving down deeper, past the pretty and shimmery surface, down through the murky and the messy, the deeper of the emotions, and down, down, down, down, to uncover the treasure chest of connection. That is where the staying power to fulfillment is. That is what sticks.

cropped avatar

ON ROYALTY, GOLDEN PEOPLE & FENCES

This morning, I took Elizabeth to the orthodontist. It was a first consultation, so everything was very easy going and pleasant. Her orthodontist shares the name of Elizabeth’s twin sister, Katherine, and when I told her, she replied that we have royalty in our house. A queen and a princess. I laughed, and said, “Would you believe we also have a prince? Prince William.”

“We do, too!” She said. “He is my little prince. He was born prematurely.” We talked briefly about her William, and then eased back into orthodontic talk surrounding Elizabeth.

As we were leaving, I mentioned that my William would be coming to see her soon, as well. She asked what she would be seeing him for, and I mentioned a cross bite and the need for an expander, because his mouth plate was too small for all of his teeth. I told her he had Down syndrome, so these issues were quite typical, and she nodded knowingly and asked how he did at the dentist. I told her it was a big struggle at first, but the last two visits, now with Dr. LaRock, had gone quite smoothly. Great, she said, maybe I could bring him in on Elizabeth’s next visit to get him comfortable here. Then, she shared with me that her William also had learning issues, due to his prematurity, but he had a great teacher this year, the same one her other son had the previous year, so she was much relieved. I replied to that, “Yes, I understand. Every year, it’s like starting at zero. It’s a wonderful relief when you don’t have to.”

“Ah, yes!” She nodded in agreement, “It’s exactly that, isn’t it? With all of his academic issues, I just want him to be happy at school.”

There are so many pieces that go together to make that work, the parents, the siblings, the IEPs, the teachers, the assistants, the special ed director, the therapists, the peers, and the laws to be upheld if not being adhered to. I have found, in this journey with a child with special needs, the explaining can be freaking exhausting. When I happen upon a doctor, or a school administrator, that just gets it like she does, I know I have struck gold.

The royal woman who shares my daughter’s name will undoubtedly be Wil’s orthodontist.

Not too long ago, I was having a very trying morning with Wil. I left the house out of sorts, to teach a bootcamp class. I pumped myself up on the way, and taught the class in high spirits, but underneath that morning was still tugging on me. After class was completed, and we all dropped on the mat to stretch, I happened to sit down with two other mothers who have kids with special needs. We talked about typical everyday things, slow and easy, enjoying the reward of the down time after a tough class. I could no longer ignore the downward pull I was feeling, and as the class emptied out, and we still sat there, foam rolling our sore muscles, I shared that I was frustrated from my morning, and I was having a hard time shaking it. They immediately gave me a nod of understanding, just like the kind doctor earlier today. They got it. No explaining needed. They opened up, began sharing some of their stories, and though our children all had different disabilities and challenges, the underlying emotions were the same. We formed a bond, and I knew, these friends were golden.

A diagnosis immediately places you in a very vulnerable position. It can be very scary at first, it’s uncharted territory for you. But you meet people who understand, who get it, and they help you along the way when you need it. You learn, and you grow, and begin to understand how golden that innate understanding is. I have lived and I have learned. There are people who have dove in and criticized, how I “Should” be doing things this way, and “should do” that and judged every little move I made. But, the funny part is, not a single one of them has a child like Wil. They are the sideline critics, and I no longer have time for them. Their words are loud, but hold no meaning. There is a quote that says, be vulnerable, then put up a big fence.

Then, there are the golden people. When I started opening myself up, so many amazing coincidences have happened that invited them into my life, for which I am eternally thankful.

In this life, I have found that unity and a sense of community is everything. These friends are my gold, they are my shine. We serve to brighten one another. And, if you are one of those that enjoys throwing stones at things that shine, I hope you enjoy the view of our big fence.

ivy wil

To Those With the Gift

FullSizeRender
There are some people who are just extra special, that have the “gift.” I am not one of them. At least in the sense of what I am speaking.

Today, we had an 8-year-old friend of Wil’s over. In the last 2 years, Wil has not been invited to a birthday party or a sleep over, yet I know very many kids his age are doing so.

I understand. I get it. I don’t say this to make anyone reading this feel a sense of guilt. It’s simply our reality.

I watched Wil play ball with a group of typically developing boys. They were so kind and patient with him. They encouraged him and included him fully. But when he grew tired of the game and walked off of his own will, I could see the sense of relief in the boys’ faces. They could just play. They did not have to be patient. They just played with others of their own level.

You may say, well, that is a good lesson for them, and yes, I would agree it is. But, really, they are 8 years old. They just want to play. Didn’t you? I know I did.

So today, when Wil’s 8-year-old friend, Lila, who asked for this play date with him came over, I was just as thrilled as Wil. She was not cajoled by her mother out of the act of kindness or charity, she simply out of her own will, like most typical 8-year-old kids, asked for a play date with someone they like.

I was also a little nervous. When she came over before, Wil’s two sisters were here. This little girl is smart. Very intelligent and very brave. She can easily hold her own with tight twin girls who are two years her senior. When you are 8, that 2 year difference is a big deal, but not for her. When Wil had his stubborn moments, he could have a break while she played with his sisters.

Not today.

Wil’s sisters were with their Grandma and Grandpa Taylor. A fun swimming and boating day with another 10-year-old friend an hour away.

The play date started off well, a new introduction to toys, then lunch, that part is easy for just about anyone. But, Wil does not speak the same level she does and he still loves Dora and Doc McStuffins. Kid stuff. Fine by her, we’ll just move on to something that doesn’t need an age limit. Let’s play Wil’s drums!

BOOM BANG CLING (oh, yeah, the cymbals, too). Out came the recorder, and whatever else I had in that music box. It was the happiest I’ve been as a mother of three in the midst of ear shattering noise.

Then it was off to the hose, and the slide that goes into the little pool. Splashing, spraying, laughing and squealing. Water is always equal playing ground. Until, Wil sat at the top of the ladder and wouldn’t budge.

I have seen similar instances to this at the park. Wil has very little control over his environment. Everything and everyone move so much faster than he does. So, what would you do if you felt you had little control over your environment? If you could sit at the top of the slide and make everyone wait, when they are usually moving at warp speed ahead of you, wouldn’t you delight in making them wait? Just a little bit? So, at the top of the slide Wil sat, un-budging.

At the park, I see two reactions. Kids either “mother” and sweet talk Wil, or they just wait until I come over and take care of the situation.
Not this girl. This girl has the gift.

“GO DOWN THE SLIDE WIL!” She says loud with authority.
He gives her a look, sees that she means it, and down he goes.
I love it! She called his bluff!

You see, there is this delicate balance between being mean, being enabling, and seeing where someone is simply being a stinker.

She saw stinker, and she called it, frank, to the point, and the next moment they are back to laughing and spraying each other with the hose.

It seems so simple, so typical, from the outside looking in. But, I’m on the inside now, and Wil is just not treated in that typical way, because, well, in some ways, he’s not typical, and people just don’t know what to do with that. So when I see something like this, I see it for the gift that it is.

I’ve heard it said that everyone should have a child with special needs. And, I know exactly what the author was talking about.

How do you appreciate something like day so completely? How can a ride down the slide have so much meaning? How can a simple play date fill you so fully?

I was not born with the “gift.” And, I think, that is exactly why I believe I was gifted Wil. I would have missed so much without him.

~This post is dedicated to those of you who have “the gift” …you know who you are, and I am so very thankful for you! And, for those of you, like me, that do not have it, there is still hope, if we simply pay attention and learn from those who have it. Life is so very much brighter that way.

Sometimes it just happens…Naturally

IMG_1774[1]This morning, Wil stopped eating his breakfast and said, “Mom, my tooth is falling out!” And, sure enough his tooth was very loose.
Katherine was in the kitchen eating her breakfast, too, and she said, “Mom, why does he still have baby teeth and the big teeth are almost fully grown behind them?”….http://christieleightaylor.com/sometimes-it-just-happens-naturally/

Do I Only Love Those That Love What I Love?

I’ve noticed a very interesting dichotomy in the fight for acceptance.

For instance, on Down syndrome support pages, the majority of parents are doing their best to advocate for acceptance of our children. We rally against bullying or any derogative comments and behavior. We proclaim, “Love and acceptance for all!”

Yet, the minute someone makes a derogative comment about our children, many of these same people who just claimed “Love and acceptance for all!” are firing back with derogative comments of their own! I understand the anger, believe me, but firing back with it does little for gaining new acceptance for our cause…http://christieleightaylor.com/do-i-only-love-those-that-love-what-i-love/

kissy face

%d bloggers like this: